Category Archives: relationship

There is no Glory Without Sacrifice

“There is no Glory Without Sacrifice”, this was the theme during one of our Flag Raising Ceremonies last month.

This is an adage that means if ever we want to do or complete something in life there is always something that would be hard to do in order to get there. Someone said that “sacrifice” means forfeiture of something highly valued for the sake of one considered to have a greater value or claim.

This means that there is something that we must give up in order to be successful or triumphant. For example, when I started blogging, I gave up my time for workouts at the gym during off-hours and bonding with family on weekends in order to read books and other resource materials to write articles for my blog posts.

I realized that this isn’t proper, so I decided to temporarily stop blogging for more than two months and give time to the activities which I had to give up in favor of blogging. At least, that realization and short rest had taught me to balance and manage my time well.

Bonding time with kids.

I remember the sacrifices I made to be where I am now. To finish my studies with flying colors, I had to give up some of my sleeping hours, bonding time with family and friends and perhaps even good health in order to burn the midnight candle.

Sometimes, people sacrifice family time and even time for self, friendship and good health in order to get the desired job promotion, dream house or success in their endeavors.

How about you, what sacrifices have you made to be successful or triumphant?

I’m inviting you give  your list by leaving your comments below this article.

Your friend,

Nimia Acebes

Three Ways to Develop Relationships with the People You Lead

In the article, Leaders Must Touch the Heart , I quoted these words by John Maxwell, One of the most common mistakes people make is trying to lead others before developing relationships with them.  It happens all the time.  A new manager starts with a company and expects the people working there to respond to his authority without question…the leader expects to make an impact on his people before building the relationship.  It’s possible that the followers will comply with what the leader’s position requires, but they’ll never go beyond that.

To succeed in business, never take people for granted.  Zig Ziglar says, The reality is, regardless of what business we’re in, since it is fueled by people, we are all in the people business.


Having a Sportsfest is one way of developing relationships with people.

Develop relationships with the people you lead through:

1.  Genuine Courtesy. People are delicate and sensitive.   They want to feel important.  Greet your people with a smile and don’t forget the words please and thank you.

Even the little courtesies that we give to them are important.

2.  Respect. Be punctual because punctuality is respect for other people’s time.  Listening is one of the greatest expressions of respect.  Listen to what others are saying and respond only after he finishes his statements.

3.  Appreciation for them and for their point of view

People want to feel valued and cared about.  Appreciate them for their hard work and contribution to the success of any project.  Be specific in your appreciation.  Give praises for their point of view and suggestions for the success of the organization.  Give them small gifts occasionally, as a token of appreciation.

In the book, The Leadership Challenge, James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner say, Leadership is a relationship between those who aspire to lead and those who choose to follow.  It’s the quality of this relationship that matters most when we’re engaged in getting extraordinary things done.  A leader-constituent relationship that’s characterized by fear and distrust will never, ever produce anything of lasting value.  A relationship characterized by mutual respect and confidence will overcome the greatest adversities and leave a legacy of significance.

Public Allies, an AmeriCorps organization dedicated to creating young leaders who can strengthen their communities, sought the opinions of eighteen- to thirty-year-olds on the subject of leadership.  One of the questions was about the important qualities of a good leader.  Topping the respondents’ list is “Being able to see a situation from someone else’s point of view.”  In second place is “Getting along well with other people.”

I shall be very glad if you could leave your comments after reading this article.  I love to hear from you.

Your friend,

Nimia S. Acebes 

Focusing on Costs as an Area which Needs Improvement

In my  article on How to Know What Areas Need Improvement , the first guide that I give is to focus on costs.

The article stresses that whatever your organization is, whether you are operating for profit or with a budget, like a government agency, the good result of initiating with a cost reduction is great.

This doesn’t mean that we eliminate necessary services, such as income-generating activity, in order to reduce costs.  It means producing more products and services for every amount that the organization spends.

You must analyze and act assertively on how the present operating expenses can produce more products and services or  how the same volume or products and services can be produced at lesser costs.

A manager’s basic function is to get the work done, but certainly not at any cost.  Finding ways to improve your operations with better, less wasteful methods is as important a contribution to your company as meeting production quotas and schedules.  Here’s how to balance the two areas of responsibility:

*  Use Time Well. Wasted time is one of the costliest elements in any operation.  A manager can cut this waste by engaging the right equipment, the right materials and the right people at the right time.  Time is the essential element.  The lack of any factor at the right time holds up the job and increases costs.  Learn these facts about each operation:  how long it takes, how many people are needed, how the work flows from station to station, and the capacity of each station.

*  Coordinate Correctly. After determining just what has to be done, where, and by whom, each step must be coordinated.  Proper coordination can eliminate waiting for assignments or supplies, cut down chasing time for information or materials, and assure optimum use of workers and equipment.

*  Insure Proper Work Flow. Sometimes poor work flow just sort of grows from a lack of any real planning.  Improper work flow results in uneven workloads and unproductive waiting time.  Don’t let time-wasting bad habits develop into accepted procedures.

*  Schedule Carefully. Any kind of bottleneck adds to costs, but you can avoid some of them with proper scheduling.  Even the occasional rush job should not throw off your schedule if you have padded in a little extra time for the inevitable emergencies.  If you don’t need the time, you don’t have to use it.  But if you do need it, using it won’t create excessive costs.

*  Use Manpower Efficiently. Failing to use available manpower to the fullest potential is always the costliest item of doing business.  Target these areas of waste:

–        Using more workers on a job than are actually needed.

–        Not having enough workers on a job, resulting in unnecessary overtime.

–        Using highly paid, skilled workers on jobs that lower paid workers can do.

–        Failure to use skilled workers in their specialties for reasons of day-to-day expediency.

–        Failure to give adequate on-the-job training.

–        Not policing the overtime.  Is it really necessary or would realistic scheduling help reduce it?

As good executive, you shall act as role model in terms of cost reduction. According to John Maxwell, When they need to cut cost, many executives will sacrifice employees ahead of their own corporate perks. They see their OWN picture instead of the big picture. I believe that a leader should not ask others to make sacrifices until he’s made some himself. A good employee is simply too valuable to let go without exhausting other options.

If you have any other cost reduction ideas to include in this list, I shall be very glad to hear from you.

Your friend,

Nimia Acebes

Effective Leaders LEAD

A young officer in the Army discovered that he had no change when he tried to buy a soft drink from a vending machine. He flagged down a passing private and asked him, “Do you have change for a dollar?”

The private said cheerfully, “I think so. Let me take a look.”

The officer drew himself up stiffly and said, “Soldier, that is no way to address a superior. We’ll start all over again. Do you have change for a dollar?”

The private came to attention, saluted smartly, and said, “No, sir!”

Each of us commands some authority. There are or will be those we guide, supervise, rear, mentor or lead. Some of us will be effective and others will feel as if we’re running a cemetery: we’ve got a lot of people under us and nobody’s listening.

Much has been written and taught about leadership, but I find that at least four traits are common in all people of authority who effectively elicit cooperation and respect from those who look up to them. Whether you are a parent, whether you find yourself in the workplace, sitting on a volunteer committee or teaching some-one a new skill, these traits will help you effectively guide those who
would seek to follow.

These good leaders are…

L isteners. They take time to listen to the suggestions and concerns of those they endeavor to lead.

E ncouragers. They don’t try to do it all themselves. Neither do they motivate by force or guilt. They encourage others and help bring out their best.

A ssertive. They say what needs to be said without being unkind. They tell the truth as they see it, openly and frankly.

D ecisive. They know what needs to be done and they make timely, even difficult, decisions when necessary. But they can also take charge without running over the people in their lives.

In short, good leaders L-E-A-D!

It’s said that the trouble with being a leader today is that you can’t be sure whether people are following you or chasing you. But those who will develop these four traits are sure to find that their authority will be valued and respected.

— Taken from an article by Steve Goodier on the Four Traits of Effective Leaders at http://www.lifesupportsystem.com

A Good Leader is PROUD

We look for a good leader to lead us into achieving our goals; to lead us into prosperity and greatness.  Whenever failures happen in a country or organization we oftentimes attribute it to poor leadership.

What are the qualities of a good leader?  A good leader is

People developer.

John Maxwell says, The growth and development of people is the highest calling of leadership. Most leaders are not successful on this because it takes a lot of hard work and patience.

People are the most important assets of an organization and developing them demands our time, attention and commitment.

A supervisor is briefing an employee on how the result shall look like.

Resilient.  The ability to bounce back when the problems arise.  Doug Dickerson  says that a resilient leader learns from every experience and never gives up in the face of adversity.

Organized.  The ability to organize time, paper and people so that potential productivity can be translated into a coherent program.

Stephanie Winston, in her book,  the Organized Executive says, Organizing is, quite simply, a learned skill – a set of methods and tools with which to arrange your time and workload to meet your goals.  

Understanding.  In his book, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, Stephen Covey says, The more deeply you understand other people, the more you will appreciate them, the more reverent you will feel about them…When we really, deeply understand each other, we open the door to creative solutions and third alternatives.  Our differences are no longer stumbling blocks to communications and progress.  Instead, they become the stepping stones to synergy.

Disciplined.  The willingness to do what is required regardless of personal mood.  Self-discipline is the foundation of good relationship because without self-discipline you will be rude, insensitive and unfair to other people.

Mike Tyson, an American boxer, says, Without discipline, no matter how good you are, you are nothing!

In short, a good leader is P-R-O-U-D. If you have these qualities as a leader, you will be loved and respected by your people.

Your friend,

Nimia Acebes